Jen Rulon

I LOVE The Whoop. I do. I would have never have thought to LOVE an object but I do. Why? The Whoop is the SHIT. It keeps my ass accountable as I am trying to have the best year yet.

There are days when you jump into bed at 10:30 pm, you sleep until 6:30 am and you think, “I got 8 hours of sleep.” Think again. The Whoop has taught me that it isn’t so!

The Whoop has come up with some new algothriums that I wanted to share with you from last couple of weeks.
Wednesday, May 17 – Tuesday, May 23

I left for Boston that Friday. So, I had to do my long bike on Thursday before I left. I was pretty tired that Friday am but had time to get on the “dreadmill” at the hotel before the weekend began.  Took Saturday off due to the workshop that I attended too. Ran 9.5 miles on Sunday on the Boston Marathon course. Tried to get up early to run again on Monday. I couldn’t do it. I was beat BUT knew I needed to get something in before I headed back home to San Antonio, as I knew I wouldn’t get anything done that evening. I had time to run on the “dreadmill” again. That Tuesday, I did a 3000 meter swim with an easy bike. I could tell I was exhausted. Look at the 20th – 23rd. I wasn’t recovering. Right! The Whoop also tells me…”Hey DumbAss, you need to recover!”

As a triathlon/strength coach, I have worked with numerous athletes throughout the years: From sprint distance triathletes, to 7x Ironman Triathlon triathletes. I have  AMAZING relationships with some of the athletes that I have coached, and not so great relationships with others. I have had some athletes who have gone to other coaches (totally fine; it’s a growing process!). I have had some athletes quit the sport completely. I have also had to fire some of my athletes. Why? I was putting more work into coaching them than they were putting in for themselves. I don’t work that way.

The other day, I received a question from a potential athlete, and I LOVE what they asked me: “What are my expectations as a coach?” As I started thinking about her question, I realized that I need to tell my potential athletes my expectations from the start. Maybe the athletes that I fired were never “aligned” with my expectations? Maybe the athletes that went to another coach wanted a different approach to coaching. Another thought that I had was that the athletes that I am coaching now and the athletes I have coached in the past Exceed my Expectations. Why? These athletes, aka friends, know that I expect GREAT things from myself as an athlete. Why would I think any differently with the athletes that I coach?  To make it clear cut, I came up with:

 Jen Rulon’s Coaching ExpectationsCoach Monica-2

Race day is around the corner. It may be your first Ironman Triathlon or your 6th Ironman 70.3 Triathlon. You are STOKED. You have done the training. You have put the time and effort in the pool, on the road and in the running shoes. #BAM, you got this!

It’s RACE DAY!

Gun goes off.

You ROCK the swim.

You get on the bike. Your nutrition is like a the “buffet” line and you grab what is on the course. Bike is finished.

The run is your thang or so you thought. Body isn’t feeling good. You want to throw up but you opt to walk instead.

You crossed that finish line but super disappointed.

What happened? Where did things go wrong?

I have one word for you and maybe you have already figured it out:

NUTRITION

Race Day nutrition is a VERY challenging concept for an Ironman Triathlon and an Ironman 70.3 Triathlon but with some trial and error, planning, along with getting information from the right people, I can guarantee that you will NOT have an issue on the race course.

Let’s talk a little bit of science and then let me give you a real life example.